You might be a racist…

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One of the discussions we have in my classes on a regular basis is about cross cultural communications. I have a few rules in class about discussions. The first of which is you don’t have to agree with anyone, but you should know how to respectfully disagree. And two – if you feel someone says something inappropriate, including me, say something.

I don’t claim to be an expert. I listen. We discuss.

If you’ve ever uttered lines such as:

  • “He’s good looking for a black guy.”
  • “She’s a nice black girl.”
  • Any version of, “Some of my best friends are black,” or “I have black friends.”
  • “All lives matter.”
  • Told a black joke to your black friend (and you’re not black).
  • Quoted statistics of white people killed by cops.

You’ve either came across as ignorant or racist.

These are insensitive and can be interpreted as hateful. Learning to communicate effectively takes time and practice.

If you hear others say these things and feel safe, let them know these things are inappropriate.

If you’re uncertain what you or others have said is inappropriate, ask someone – and understand the reasoning.

Check out these articles.

“Some of My Best Friends Are Black”

Why You Should Stop Saying All Lives Matter”

“Don’t Understand the Protests?”

“27 Things White People Should Never Say…”

 

To understand how to better communicate across cultures:

52 Activities for Improving Cross Cultural Communication

 

It is not my intention to label or call names. I am asking that you be aware of what you’re saying and how you sound.

We all need to be more sensitive in the way we speak to and think of one another. We share a planet. We are all brothers and sisters. We are all beautiful human beings.

Published by

Noreen Lace

Originally from the Midwest, Noreen Lace received an MFA from California State University where she now teaches. She believes in the beauty of language to express the darkness in life. She is the author of two novellas, West End and Life of Clouds, as well as a book of short stories. Here in the Silence. Her fiction and poetry have appeared in national as well as international journals, including The Chicago Tribune's Printers Row Journal, The Oleander Review, Vine Leaves Press (Australia), Silver Stream Journal (Ireland), Pilcrow and Dagger, Fishfood, and others. "Memorial Day Death Watch," a memoir of her father's passing, placed as a finalist in Writer Advice, while her poem, "All at Once," was published as a finalist in Medusa's Laugh Contest issue. More work is always in progress.

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